DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

To provide reading groups with informed and thought-provoking questions, some important aspects of the plot are revealed in each novel’s respective section. If you have not finished reading the novel, PLEASE wait before reviewing it’s discussion questions.

  1. Bad Analysis has many loathsome characters. Who is your ‘favourite’? Why?
  2. Is Craig Wilson flawed: How and why?
  3. What do you think of the author’s description of the challenges, and naivety, of Government when trying to combat terrorism?
  4. Bad Analysis deals with racism, terrorism and ethnic cleansing in the Western World: How well does the author deal with these issues? Do you agree with his portrayal? Why or why not?
  5. Did the multiple plot lines of international intelligence and personal relationships add to, or detract from, the main plot? How, why, or why not?
  6. Anthony Mitten-Wells has a vision of how England should be: Do you think he is alone in this view? Are there any current indications in Western social and political culture that might support such a view – for England and other countries?
  7. Many of the scenes in Bad Analysis are very detailed: Did you find them believable and / or unsettling?
  8. Aalim is forced to comply with the conspiracy: Did he have a choice? How did Aalim’s experiences in Egypt influence his behaviour?
  9. What role do morals play in the story? How do Wilson’s, Anthony Mitten-Wells and Morris Marshal’s morals differ? Do you see parallels in your own community?
  10. Who is the strongest character in the book? Why?
  11. The books hero is a Muslim: Do you think Hollywood would ever produce a story with a Muslim hero? Why or why not?
  12. Nasreen and Masud commit murder: Were they justified?
  13. The story is really about domestic terrorism: Which is the greatest threat: international or domestic terrorism? Why?
  14. What role does love play in the story?
  15. In the final analysis, was Wilson good at his job?
  16. The author has a plan for a sequel: How do you think a sequel might be constructed?

  1. Did you like Jeff as a character? Do you think the author intended for him to be likeable?
  2. Each victim is described in their own dedicated chapter: What are your thoughts on this narrative style?
  3. In the story, many characters move through life as if it is something that happens to them; others are more proactive. How does Jeff’s behavior fit in this contrast? Does Jeff’s behaviour change? If so, how?
  4. Does Jeff, before he applies himself to the task of killing off his competitors, remind you of any public servants you might know?
  5. Is Jeff’s motive compelling enough? Why or Why not?
  6. How would you assess Jeff’s mental state throughout the book? Does it change? If so how?
  7. What do you make of Detective Stapleton and his methods? Why does he doodle and draw pictures?
  8. What was your initial opinion of each of the victims?
  9. What was your opinion of Rory O’Grady? Was he a sympathetic character or a deserving patsy?
  10. How did you feel when Jeff drugged his own children? Was this act a turning point in Jeff’s character change?
  11. Six deaths in seven days: Could it be done? Why or Why not?
  12. Did Jeff begin to enjoy killing? If so, at what point?
  13. Amy’s mother was collateral damage: Did you agree with Jeff’s view?
  14. The book is heavily critical of the public service bureaucracy: Do you agree with the authors opinions? Are the anecdotes believable?
  15. What risks does Jeff take when he kills his victims? Would you have taken them? Is it reasonable that he ‘got away with it’?
  16. What did think of Jeff’s decision to murder Philip? Did you agree? Were you angry with Jeff?
  17. Do you think Jeff will be caught?
  18. How would you construct a sequel?
  19. Do you know, really know, who is sitting in the cubicle beside you?

  1. Do you like Alan? Did you find yourself cheering for Alan? Did your opinion of Alan change? Why or Why not?
  2. Does the author intend for us to think of Alan as a victim? Does the author succeed? Why or Why not?
  3. Do you think Alan’s journey across Canada is believable? What do you think about the truck driver, bus driver, and the other characters Alan meets in Canada?
  4. What is the role of Mr. Grey? Does the author succeed? Why or Why not?
  5. Discuss Alan’s relationship with Fred. What is the author’s intent with Fred? How does the author use it to best effect?
  6. What do you make of Max? Is he right? Discuss Max’s notebook. Did max deserve to die?
  7. How did you react to Alan’s ultimate decline, as portrayed in the ‘plastic room’? Did Alan have a choice?
  8. What did you think about the climax to Alan’s time in Vanuatu? Why?
  9. As experienced consumers of thriller and action, readers often expect stories to have a certain flow and pace or a specific mold: a story, a villain, a heroine, a winner, a loser. How does Some People Deserve to Die fit this expectation?
  10. Discuss Alan’s experience in Scotland. Do his experiences in Glasgow and on the oil rig change Alan? If so how?  Why do you think the author developed Alan’s relationships with Sven and Derek?
  11. Discuss Nigeria. Is the portrayal of Nigeria, MEND, the settings and the self-interested actions of the army, local authorities and international corporations believable? What do you think of the mercenaries and how do his experiences with them change Alan?
  12. Was Alan right to kill his friend Sven? Why or Why not?
  13. Back in Toronto, destitute and broken, Alan’s arrest leads to his rehabilitation. Discuss how it happened and decide if you believe Alan has really changed.
  14. Alan draws on all his life experience to find, hunt and kill the people he held responsible for all that happened to him and his family. Is this part of the story believable? Could a person really do all that? Would you do that?
  15. On Sand Hill Island, Alan uses great ingenuity to terrorise and kill his victims. Did you ‘like’ the methods? Why or why not?
  16. What emotions did you experience when Alan reads the letter from his mother and discovers the truth about his sister’s rape, his father’s death and his mother’s regret?
  17. Did you believe Alan would have committed suicide?
  18. Were you satisfied with the book’s ending? What do you think the future holds for Alan?
  19. Did you spot the two plants in the book that could be the foundation of a sequel?
  20. Do you believe that some people deserve to die?

  1. What do you think of the author’s characterization of the sex trade?
  2. Escape From Prague has many loathsome characters. Who is your ‘favourite’? Why?
  3. The story deals with prostitution: How well does the author deal with these issues?
  4. Do you agree with his portrayal? Why or why not?
  5. Do you agree with Krystyna’s decision to leave Anna behind in Prague? Why, or why not?
  6. Many of the scenes in Escape From Prague are very detailed: Did you find them believable and / or unsettling?
  7. Did Krystyna have a choice? How did her childhood influence her actions and decisions?
  8. Is Krystyna’s motive compelling enough? Why or Why not?
  9. What role do morals play in the story? How do Edvard, Tyrion, and Stringer’s morals compare?
  10. Do you see parallels in your own community, in society, in the law?
  11. What is Stringer’s issue? Is it enough to explain his actions?
  12. Who is the strongest character in the book? Why?
  13. Do you think the book would make a good movie? Why or why not?
  14. Were Krystyna and Anna justified in their actions at the end of the story?
  15. What role does love play in the story?
  16. What is your opinion of the sex trade? Should it be regulated and taxed, or should it be outlawed and driven out of site?
  17. What might be a sequel for the story?

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